A slightly more advanced example scene


To illustrate some of the more complex features of EAR and the Blender add-on, a slightly more advanced example scene is provided that focuses on the animation aspects of the add-on. As is seen in the simple example scene, sound sources and listeners are defined as Blender Empty objects, but these can also be animated. For that matter soundtracks of the sounds that they make and encounter in their movements can automatically be generated. The scene consists of a listener moving through a hallway, passing a room in which a pianist is playing. The listener continues his path into another room, in which another person enters as well. The acoustical phenomena that are present in this example are much more subtle than those encountered in the simple example. A more detailed documentation for all of the features and settings is being worked on. A .zip archive that contains all necessary files is available for download on github.

Result

Convoluted wave form of the rendered result
Convoluted wave form of the rendered result (click to play)

Input

The pianist in the first room is playing a prelude by Bach.

Bach B.W.V. 999
Bach B.W.V. 999 (click to play)

Sound behaves very differently for the low frequencies and the high frequencies. For that reason impulse responses are generated for three distinct frequency ranges. If a single sound file is assigned to a sound source it is automatically split into these three frequency ranges by an equalizer algorithm. However, for this example three separate sound files are explicitly specified for the respective frequency ranges that consist of the bass notes, the high notes and the notes in between.

Bach B.W.V. 999 low notes
Bach B.W.V. 999 low notes (click to play)
Bach B.W.V. 999 mid notes
Bach B.W.V. 999 mid notes (click to play)
Bach B.W.V. 999 high notes
Bach B.W.V. 999 high notes (click to play)

Walkthrough

Configuration of the scene at frame 1
The configuration of the scene at frame 1 shows the starting position of all moving objects
Configuration of the scene at frame 500
The configuration of the scene at frame 500
Soundtracks are automatically generated for storyboard objects
Soundtracks are automatically generated for objects that have their Storyboard checkbox ticked. When such an object has travelled a distance of equal to the length of a single step a footstep is played.
Material steps directory
The sound of such footsteps is defined by a directory that contains a collection of .wav files of which for each step a sound is randomly selected
The portal object
When a storyboard object moves through a portal object, the corresponding sound of the portal is played

Storyboards

Storyboard 1
Storyboard 1 (click to play)
Storyboard 2
Storyboard 1 (click to play)
The triple band sound file
Sound behaves differently for different frequencies. For detailed control over the sound that is emitted for the three different frequency bands use a triple band sound file

Isolated convolutions

For reference, the convoluted sound sources are also provided separately. This gives a better impression of the acoustical effects. The convolution sound gives a clear impression of how the volume of the successive spaces alters the reverberation of the footsteps. The second shows how the balance between direct and indirect sound of the piano music alters its timbre. The third illustrates how the perceived distance of the footsteps is much larger, because of the larger indirect component. As these are individually normalized, playing them simultaneously yields a slightly different result than playing the final result.

Convoluted wave form of Storyboard 1
Convoluted wave form of Storyboard 1 (click to play)
Convoluted wave form of Storyboard 2
Convoluted wave form of Storyboard 2 (click to play)
Convoluted wave form of B.W.V. 999
Convoluted wave form of B.W.V. 999 (click to play)